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  • « A policy that's working? Really? | Main | The Party of No is closed for business »

    February 03, 2010

    Chris Matthews dismantles FRC hack

    Posted by: Chris

    MSNBC's Chris Matthews shows why "Hardball" is the best political show on cable. The debate over Don't Ask Don't Tell between Aubrey Davis of the Servicemembers Legal Defense Network and Peter Sprigg of the antigay Family Research Council, is given enough time to go below the surface and Sprigg is given enough rope to hang himself.

    To be sure, Matthews helps Sprigg along, and in the process shows that his opposition to open service by gays in the military is actually only the tip of the iceberg. The FRC and its conservative Republican allies would, if they had the power, ban gays entirely from serving and even jail sexually active gay people.

    The only piece of the puzzle left unsaid it is that the same sodomy laws that Sprigg and his ilk favor would actually imprison the vast majority of heterosexuals as well, since studies show than more than 80 percent of straight people (in and out of the military) engage in oral and anal sodomy, which would also be criminalized.

    (QuickTime video for iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad users after the jump).

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    Comments

    1. cheap ugg boots on Nov 22, 2010 3:34:59 AM:

      The White House is already signaling resistance to the idea -- no doubt Rahm Emmanuel's handiwork -- and Harry Reid proved just how quickly a great idea can be spoiled by gamesmanship. Yesterday's Q&A with Senate Democrats just so happened to feature moderates facing re-election this year, each of whom asked tough questions of the president that they can now use in campaign commercials back home.

    1. cheap uggs on Nov 29, 2010 2:30:32 AM:

      I was just posting elsewhere that I'm guessing that the debate this time is not going to center on unit cohesion, even though they will play it for what last measure it is worth. I'm guessing it is going to be about partner benefits, DOMA, and personal conduct issues - and using the military to "experiment' on those topics.

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